The Udo and Anette Brandhorst collection is an impressive ensemble of modern and contemporary art – works by artists such as Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Bruce Nauman, Mike Kelley, Alex Katz, Eric Fischl, Damien Hirst, Katharina Fritsch to name but a few. It will be open to the public on May 21st 2009 in Munich.

ph: Andreas Lechtape

ph: Andreas Lechtape

The architectural language was devised by Studio Sauerbruch Hutton. It is deliberately understated and forms the background for a powerful esthetic experience. The new building designed by Sauerbruch Hutton is a light and airy conversion of one wing of the former barracks. Twenty-one different colors have been used to add splashes of energy to the façade that now resembles an abstract painting and underlines the building’s function as an art museum. One important element is the lighting concept by Arup Lighting, London. The Brandhorst Museum placed great emphasis on the use of natural as opposed to artificial light.

Interior view of the Museum Brandhorst © Noshe

Interior view of the Museum Brandhorst © Noshe

The design concept for this museum aimed to illuminate more than just the top floor with natural light. In order to reach and uniformly illuminate the ground floor, a system of reflectors directs light into the galleries from the roof of the building.Throughout the exhibition spaces, natural sunlight (up to 100,000 lux in summer) is filtered through a series of blades and is reduced to gallery strength (approx. 300 lux). Stretched translucent fabric evenly distributes the natural light. Moreover, artificial light sources have been installed above the fabric and can be used to supplement or replace natural daylight when needed. Calculations indicated that, depending on the floor, natural light can be used for between 50%-75% of the museum’s normal opening hours. This not only creates an outstanding quality of light for the works of art on display, but also leads to significant savings in the museum’s operating costs.

Interior view of the Museum Brandhorst © Noshe

Interior view of the Museum Brandhorst © Noshe

The ceilings covered with a stretched transparent fabric shape the visual appearance of the ground floor and the galleries on the upper level. This ceiling arrangement, clearly visible from below, provides an evenly distributed, diffuse natural light with no direct sunlight penetrating the ambiences. This can be integrated with artificial light sources concealed behind the lowered ceiling. Intelligent control elements ensure the correct intensity of the illumination and limit the amount of damaging light reaching the exhibits.

Posted on: Monday, May 11th, 2009 at 15:19
Filed under: architecture
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